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Amp:bit Headphone and Speaker Add On

Tutorial

Description
 

This short video introduces the amp:bit. This product is the easiest way to hook up a set of headphones or speakers to your BBC micro:bit. Simply plug the micro:bit into the amp:bit and then plug in your headphones! Alternatively, you can solder a PC speaker directly to the provided pads or solder a screw terminal. The amp:bit also features a built-in volume control!

 

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Exhi:bit Assembly Guide

exhi-bit Pedestrian Crossing experiment board

 

This guide will show you how to assemble the pedestrian crossing project board for the exhi:bit prototyping system for micro:bit. We also show you a quick demo of it running at the end. Please note the Red LEDs look orange in this video, that’s due to the camera and lighting used.

You can view the code here: https://gist.github.com/anonymous/3ff744516d7281a8415fec9a3a9b137f

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Micro:bit Distance Reader with Haptic Feedback

One cold and blustery morning, Ewan had an idea! “How about using a micro:bit with a distance sensor and a haptic feedback driver to create an Electronic “white stick”.

This task was handed to myself, and after reading a few data sheets, I designed a circuit and then a PCB that can mount to a micro:bit.

The PCB has a ST VL53L0X ‘Time of Flight’ sensor to measure the distance (this works up to around 1.2 Meters and down as low as 30mm) and a TI DRV2605 haptic feedback driver, with a vibration motor.

After laying out the PCB and getting it manufactured, it was time to solder the components. As the passive components were 0603 size, these were easy to solder by hand, the TI DRV2605 has a 0.5mm pitch, so not too difficult. The VL53L0X was an LGA12 package, with tiny, 0.5mm pads on the bottom. This required mounting with hot-air, but managed it on my second attempt (Not bad as this was only the 2nd BGA style chip I have mounted).

Next came the firmware, I chose to program this in PYTHON, while I’ve not had much experience with this programming language, There are thousands of resources online. I started by searching the web for Arduino Libraries, this way I could connect an Arduino with jumper wires, and test that the assembly of the PCB was working. This also gave me a reference for the calls required to make the devices work. The haptic chip had a few Arduino libraries on the web, and they all used the same calls to set up the chip, so understanding the code was straight forward.